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The Benefits of Coenzyme Q10

Something of a mouthful to pronounce, Coenzyme Q10 is often shortened to CoQ10. The nutrient is present in meat, fish and poultry. However, only around a quarter of CoQ10 comes from diet, with the rest produced by naturally occurring processes within the body.

Our body’s cells need Coenzyme Q10 for basic maintenance and to process energy. It’s vital that we have adequate levels of this nutrient to ensure that our metabolism, brains, bones and muscles are all functioning properly. It is also an antioxidant, meaning that it rids the body of free radicals – waste products of natural chemical reactions – that can damage cells.

A number of recent studies have looked at the effect of Coenzyme Q10 on conditions as varied as Parkinson’s disease, low sperm count, vision loss and migraines. Whilst research is still in its early stages, there have been some promising results. In particular, some studies have shown that Coenzyme Q10 can help with the prevention and treatment of gum disease.

Most people’s bodies produce adequate amounts of the nutrient. However, levels of CoQ10 can decrease with age and there is evidence that people with heart disease can also be at risk.

If you think you might benefit from Coenzyme Q10 supplements, it is always best to seek advice from your dentist or GP first, as CoQ10 can interact with some medication, such as the blood-thinning drug Warfarin.

To arrange an appointment with Dr. Richard Marques, please call 020 7637 1672 or 07528 696 946.

To order Coenzyme Q10 from our new range, please click here.

Why charcoal is the hottest new ingredient in dental care

Charcoal Toothpaste

Most people think of charcoal as something you throw on the barbeque, but it has been used since Egyptian times for anything from purifying water to getting rid of bad smells. In Ancient Greece, Hippocrates treated his patients with charcoal and the Romans ground it up to clean their teeth.

Today, activated charcoal continues to be used in hospitals and water treatment plants. Its porous structure means it soaks up poisons and harmful chemicals. But in recent years, this ancient substance has been emerging as a hot new ingredient in the dental and beauty industry.

How do you 3D print veneers

If you want to get veneers, normally the dentist first has to create a mould of your teeth. That mould is sent to a laboratory where a technician creates the veneer by hand. You then have to wait – often up to several weeks – before you can return to the clinic to have your veneers fitted. But advances in 3D printing technology mean that you could soon have your veneers created and fitted on the spot, and in less than an hour.

3D printing is revolutionising the health sector. It can now be used to create anything from hip replacements to prosthetics. However, the machine used to create veneers is not 3D printing in the conventional sense – which involves building an object layer by layer. Instead, the machine carves the veneers from a block, in a process more akin to computer-aided sculpture.

Why it’s never too late to straighten your teeth

If your teeth are a little crooked or crowded, you might think it’s too late to do anything about it. After all, when we think of braces, we think of that awkward teenager, too self-conscious to smile and show a mouthful of metal. But increasingly, people of all ages are asking their dentists to fit braces – or aligners – to help them achieve that perfect smile. Some dentists report that 50% of the patients they fit braces on are adults, with 60, 70 and even 80 years olds coming in for treatment. And the good news is that you don’t have to look like the geek from an eighties movie to achieve the desired look.